Olive Ridley Project

Olive Ridley Project

At a glance

Causes

  • Animals / wildlife
  • Environment

Other details

Geographical remit: 
International

Objectives

The Olive Ridley Project (ORP) actively removes lost, discarded, or abandoned fishing gear from the Indian Ocean and its coastal beaches. We also attempt to mitigate this problem before it reaches the ocean by promoting the recycling of end-of-life fishing equipment in order to reduce the amount of derelict fishing gear that ends up in the ocean.

The ORP, in conjunction with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), have developed a standardised protocol detailing the information needed when recording ghost gear recoveries and marine life entanglements. We continue to conduct workshops, seminars, presentations, and lectures to the general public throughout the Indian Ocean, teaching data collection protocols for recovered ghost gear. Currently, scientific data on ghost gear and their impacts on, and interactions with, marine turtles in the Indian Ocean are extremely limited. The information we collect will create a clearer understanding of the problem with our ultimate goal being mitigating the impacts of ghost gear.

We are also part of a global alliance of governments, industries, NGOs, and IGOs known as the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI), which was initially founded by World Animal Protection in 2014. The GGGI aims to collectively save millions of marine animals from ghost fishing globally by collecting information and promoting improved disposal facilities for end-of-life fishing gear. Currently, we are the only group collecting data within the Indian Ocean region.

Olive Ridley sea turtles are the predominant species found entangled in ghost gear in the Indian Ocean. They are attracted to the gear as places to rest and find food in the barren open ocean. Many of these entangled turtles suffer severe injuries, often leading to exhaustion, severe dehydration, and, eventually death. The ORP plans to build a turtle rehabilitation centre managed by an experienced veterinarian that can offer temporary care for entangled turtles. After any rescue our aim is always to release entangled turtles back into the wild where possible, this temporary care and first aid would give any turtles a greater chance of survival after release.

Activities

The Olive Ridley Project (ORP) actively removes lost, discarded, or abandoned fishing gear from the Indian Ocean and its coastal beaches. We also attempt to mitigate this problem before it reaches the ocean by promoting the recycling of end-of-life fishing equipment in order to reduce the amount of derelict fishing gear that ends up in the ocean.

The ORP, in conjunction with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), have developed a standardised protocol detailing the information needed when recording ghost gear recoveries and marine life entanglements. We continue to conduct workshops, seminars, presentations, and lectures to the general public throughout the Indian Ocean, teaching data collection protocols for recovered ghost gear. Currently, scientific data on ghost gear and their impacts on, and interactions with, marine turtles in the Indian Ocean are extremely limited. The information we collect will create a clearer understanding of the problem with our ultimate goal being mitigating the impacts of ghost gear.

We are also part of a global alliance of governments, industries, NGOs, and IGOs known as the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI), which was initially founded by World Animal Protection in 2014. The GGGI aims to collectively save millions of marine animals from ghost fishing globally by collecting information and promoting improved disposal facilities for end-of-life fishing gear. Currently, we are the only group collecting data within the Indian Ocean region.

Olive Ridley sea turtles are the predominant species found entangled in ghost gear in the Indian Ocean. They are attracted to the gear as places to rest and find food in the barren open ocean. Many of these entangled turtles suffer severe injuries, often leading to exhaustion, severe dehydration, and, eventually death. The ORP plans to build a turtle rehabilitation centre managed by an experienced veterinarian that can offer temporary care for entangled turtles. After any rescue our aim is always to release entangled turtles back into the wild where possible, this temporary care and first aid would give any turtles a greater chance of survival after release.

No current opportunities

Search for volunteer opportunities with other organisations.